see balance the books; black book; bring to book; by the book; closed book; close the books; cook the books; crack a book; hit the books; in one's book; in someone's bad graces (books); judge a book by its cover; know like a book; make book; nose in a book; one for the books; open book; take a leaf out of someone's book; throw the book at; wrote the book on.
In October 2015, Hawaiian Airlines announced that they will be upgrading their business class seats from the standard cradle seats to a 180-degree lie-flat seats on their A330 fleet in a 2-2-2 configuration. The new seats will be installed starting the second quarter of 2016. In addition to the new business class seats upgrade, the airline will add 28 additional Extra Comfort seating.[101]
The Jersey Shore, renowned for the reality TV show of the same name, is a vibrant and much-visited part of the Atlantic coastline. Dozens of beaches form a ribbon of sandy fun, starting with Sandy Hook at the northern tip, about 45 miles from Newark. The five ocean and bay beaches at Sandy Hook cover seven miles within the Gateway National Recreation Area of the National Park Service, providing beach visits in pristine forested areas. After spending time swimming, surf fishing, windsurfing or boating in the water, visitors can check out the Sandy Hook Lighthouse, with tours in the afternoons from April through October.
For naturist fun on the Mayan Riviera, Hidden Beach Resort is an all-inclusive, adults-only playground. Guests here may be nude throughout the resort, from sunbathing to dining and dancing. There is even a full-day nude cruise. Beyond the resort, guests can sign up for visits to the Mayan ruins in Tulum, golfing, swimming with dolphins, or watching a bullfight, but clothing is required for these options.
Relaxed and lively, Samurai Beach lies about 2 1/2 hours north of Sydney via the Pacific Motorway. Along Samurai's 1/2-mile expanse of white sand, nudists let it all hang out while playing volleyball, tug-of-war and Frisbee. To reach Samurai, visitors must traverse the tricky terrain of One Mile Beach (think scrub and rocks) and are advised to pack adequate footwear. 

In August 2012, Hawaiian announced an upgrade to its economy-class inflight U.S. mainland service. Among the upgrades were a new menu, a complimentary glass of wine on lunch/dinner flights and a free tropical cocktail before landing on breakfast flights. This was in contrast to other airlines cutting back on meal service.[99] According to Hawaiian's CEO Mark Dunkerley:
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